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Whistle Blower Requirement
#1
UkraineGate, son of RussiaGate, raises an interesting question: is our Central Intelligence Agency really this crude that they would loan out a CIA officer to the White House’s National Security Council (NSC) and use him as a weapon to shiv the occupant of the oval office? Or was The New York Times’s unmasking of the “whistleblower” just another ruse by the Deep State Disinfo Division?
Let’s face it, there were not so many CIA spooks working in that White House office, so it shouldn’t be too hard to figure out who it was. A leading candidate is veteran CIA officer Michael Barry, an assassination expert, as it happens, who was loaned out during Mike Pompeo’s brief stint as CIA chief. Barry acted as the NSC’s chief intelligence officer. Barry or otherwise, I predict the whistleblower’s identity will be known for sure in pretty short order.
So much material in this tale doesn’t add up that it looks like the results of a math test in a Baltimore middle school. For one thing, the now public whistleblower complaint makes it clear that the whistleblower’s information is second-hand. The Intel Community Whistleblower Protection Act (ICWPA) explicitly prohibits complaints based on second-hand news: “In order to find an urgent concern credible, the IGIC [Intel Community Inspector General] must be in possession of reliable, first-hand information. The IGIC cannot transmit information via the ICWPA based on an employee’s second-knowledge of wrongdoing. This includes information received from another person, such as when a fellow employee informs you that he/she has witnessed some type of wrongdoing.” See for yourself in the ICWPA Form 401:
[Image: ICWPA-form-401.png]
Did Director of National Intelligence Joseph McGuire know that when he testified that the whistleblower’s complaint was “credible” and made in “good faith.” Did ICIG Michael Horowitz know that when he sent the whistleblower complaint to Admiral McGuire? Did House Intel Committee Chair Adam Schiff know that when he led a grandstanding exercise in his committee on Thursday?
Others have pointed out that the whistleblower’s complaint was composed as a legal brief, leading to the inference that it was constructed by lawyers and perhaps a team of lawyers. The whistleblower’s lawyer is Andrew Bakaj, a former CIA employee who got his start interning for Senator Chuck Schumer and then Hillary Clinton. The Washingtonian said Bakaj “actually wrote the CIA’s internal rules on whistleblowing.” Is that so? Did he write Form 401 then? His client’s complaint states: “I was not a direct witness to most of the events described. However, I found my colleagues’ accounts of these events to be credible because, in almost all cases, multiple officials recounted fact patterns that were consistent with one another.” In other words, second-hand information. Dismissed.
Everyone and his uncle remembers the infamous threat issued to Mr. Trump by Senator Schumer during the transition period in January, 2017: “Let me tell you: You take on the intelligence community — they have six ways from Sunday at getting back at you,” Perhaps Senator Schumer should have kept his pie-hole shut on that. He made it official that the Intel Community would act as an adversary and antagonist to the President, and that appears to be exactly what has happened. One suspects that this rogue agency has captured The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Public Radio, and several TV cable news networks as well. And now they are metamorphosing into an enemy of the people.
The moment approaches when Mr. Trump will have to carry out a severe housecleaning of the CIA and perhaps many other agencies under the executive branch of the government. Their ongoing campaign to undo the 2016 election is igniting a civil war. Clearly a part of the whistleblower gambit was an attempt to discredit Attorney General William Barr and set up a device that would force him to recuse himself from any further inquiry into shenanigans carried out in and around Ukraine since 2014, when the CIA and the Obama State Department overthrew the government of Viktor Yanukovych. Mr. Barr is a sturdy fellow. He may have seven ways from Sunday for countering their seditious monkeyshines. Wait for it.
In the meantime, is there any question that UkraineGate has put the schnitz on Joe Biden’s political career. The notorious video of Mr. Biden bragging on his shakedown of then-president Poroshenko has been seen by everybody over age five in the USA. Hillary must be lovin’ it as she makes the rounds on her latest listening tour. Listen to this, Hillary, lost in your wicked daydreams of riding to the Democratic Party’s rescue for yet another shot at the White House: your reputation will never survive the blizzard of indictments coming down on your partisans. And one of these bills might have your name on it.

https://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/...age-barge/
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#2
Holy Shit! Need more proof of a Deep State?
https://www.zerohedge.com/political/inte...wer-relied
Trump needs to do to the CIA what JFK threatened to do - before they took him out.
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#3
What's the problem with second hand knowledge ?

"Tips" are the first step of fact finding. Was the whistleblower obliged to keep his mouth shut if he suspected wrongdoing ? We have learned that there might be something to this. Trump has since admitted it.
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#4
What's the problem with second hand knowledge ?

Other than it has not been part of the rule of law since the days of Hammurabi or our legal system for over 300 years. It is called hearsay. Or how about the right of the defendant to face their accuser? Then we have the problem of Democrats and Republicans putting actual whistleblowers in prison like Chelsea Manning, forcing whistleblowers to fear their own government like Edward Snowden, and let's not even get into the inhumane treatment of Julian Assange.
You seriously don't see a problem here?
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#5
Your are getting ahead things here. The facts and evidence will come from the investigation, if an investigation is warranted. A whistleblower is not a prosecutor.

This whistleblower has every reason to fear the same fate as Manning, Snowden and Assange, or worse.
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#6
This whistleblower has every reason to fear the same fate as Manning, Snowden and Assange, or worse.

Where do you come up with this nonsense. This whistleblower/gossipspreader is being hailed a hero whereas Pelosi would throw Snowden in a dungeon should he step back on American soil.
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#7
The President of the United States issued a thinly vailed threat using words like "treason and execute". This was mostly just a serving of MAGAbait of course, but it also served as a warning to people considering coming forth to report what they believe is gov't wrongdoing. This so called gossip has been partially verified.

Snowden was not a whistleblower. His "alleged" committed crimes were based on real laws.
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#8
You may be the only person in the world who doesn't recognize Snowden as a WHISTLEBLOWER.
https://www.democracynow.org/2019/9/30/h...adition_to
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#9
(10-01-2019, 12:17 PM)k.d. Wrote: You may be the only person in the world who doesn't recognize Snowden as a WHISTLEBLOWER.
https://www.democracynow.org/2019/9/30/h...adition_to
Whistleblower is a legal designation.

Snowden could have applied for protection had he not also "allegedly' committed serious crimes.

Yes, Snowden does meet the generic definition of a whistleblower. But being a whistleblower is not why he is in exile.
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#10
"Snowden was not a whistleblower."

Make up your mind.
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